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FNSS Curriculum Integration Project Click here to download this lesson.
Noreen Pankewich (MS-Word format.)

Grade: 2/3
Lesson 2: Leadership Within the Band Community
Time: 2 x 40 minutes

Topic: Communities require leaders

Rationale: Introductory discussions (perhaps from Lesson #1) will have students discover that communities require leadership. They will be inspired to identify who the leaders are in their own community and learn that there are leaders in nearby aboriginal communities also. While these 2 community's leaders have many differences, they will also learn there are many similarities within their responsibilities to their communities. There will be a focus on leadership qualities and identifying government leaders in both communities.


Materials and Resources

  • List of local Band Councillors and Chief, and Elders; preferably with pictures
  • List of Mayor and Council; preferably with pictures
  • Worksheet 1: Leadership
  • Local Band newspaper(KIB), and Secwepemc News

Main Concepts

  • All communities have leaders.
  • Aboriginal communities have their own leaders who are unique in many ways and alike in other ways to the local municipal government and culture.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Collect and record information from a variety of sources and experiences
  • Draw simple interpretations from personal experiences, oral sources, and visual and written representations
  • Describe ways members of a community meet one another's needs
  • Demonstrate awareness of BC's and Canada's diverse heritage
  • Explain their roles, rights, and responsibilities within the community
  • Describe functions of local government
  • Describe the ways in which communities are interdependent

Vocabulary

Elder
a person who lives a good life, is kind, caring, wise, and respected in the community, and who shares his or her experiences and cultural knowledge
Elected Chief
a person elected chief of a band in a Dept. Of Indian Affairs election held according to the Indian Act.
Councillor
an elected individual who represents the people of the community and is assigned jobs to complete on their behalf
Wisdom
very wise, using good judgement, a high degree of knowledge or training
Elected
voted by the people of the community
Election
when a vote takes place
Appointed
chosen by the people without an election

Planned Learning Activities

  • The class will reflect on the character of Wesley in "Weslandia", and how his role changed as he became the leader of his community
  • The definition of "leader" will be discussed with the class as a whole
  • An open discussion of leadership terms will occur, covering: mayor, councillors, elders, chief.
  • What do these people do in the community/what are their duties to the people?
  • A piece of chart paper for each of the leaders, with an enlarged photo of their face accompanying their names. Below on the chart, their responsibilities to their communities can be listed, as submitted by the class. (This will make the similarities and differences stand out even more clearly to the students)
  • Students will learn that these people are all elected, except for elders
  • The following question should be discussed: How are elders different?
    • They possess wisdom, traditional teachings and are highly respected and recognized for this. They are respected even more than the elected people, and it should be recognized that even the elected people go to them for advice and strength.
    • They are cared for collectively by the community. They are the first to receive fish, food, and supplies when they become available.
  • With the charts posted at the front of the class have the students fill in Worksheet 1: Leadership

Assessment /Evaluation

  • Have the students recognized the role (through worksheets, artwork charts and discussions) the role of leadership in the community?
  • Have they recognized some similarities between the FN community and the local non-native community?
  • Have they recognized some differences between the FN community and the non-native community?
  • Do they understand that leaders of a community have a responsibility to their community?
  • Have the students taken part in the discussion with interest?
  • Did the student take part in a respectful discussion?
  • Did the students push ahead with further probing questions and discussion?
  • Has the artwork by the students depicted a reasonable representation of the printed explanation which accompanies it?
  • Challenged students who are unable to print explanations should be able to verbally communicate: "My artwork tells about......", as should all other students.

Summative Criteria
Ongoing "naturalistic" assessment will occur throughout this lesson and unit. Observations and discussions with students will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Does the student show an awareness of the meaning of "leadership" and its place in the community?
  • Does the student show an awareness of the unique heritage of the neighbouring aboriginal community?
  • Does the student show interest in the discussion and acknowledge that there are similarities and differences between the leaders of the two communities?
  • Are they able to come up with any other interesting question or extend the discussion beyond the general level of the classroom?

Extensions

  • A band councillor, chief or elder could come in for a visit.

Other Integrated Opportunities

  • A class election or student council election would coincide nicely with this lesson

Teacher Preparation

  • Obtain local material on leaders in the area; both aboriginal and non-aboriginal.
  • Obtain local material on elders in the area.
  • The teacher will have obtained a current list of band administration from the nearby band office.
  • The teacher should have consulted local FN Resource teacher for assistance or a contact from the local FN community to be sure that you are presenting an accurate picture of their community.
  • Perhaps they would be more comfortable if they were invited to work on the lesson with the class.
  • Don't assume anything, or rely on outdated text books.

Resources and Contacts
Books

  1. Antoine, Marie et al (ed.). (1994). Sptekwles re qelmucw: Stories of the People. Kamloops, Canada: Secwepemc Cultural Education Society.
  2. Case, Roland and Penny Clark. (1999). The Canadian Anthology of Social Studies. Vancouver, Canada: Pacific Educational Press.
  3. Costello, Robert. (2001). Macmillian Dictionary For Children. New York: Simon & Schuster.
  4. Fleishman, Paul. (2000). Weslandia. USA: Scholastic Publishing.
  5. Haig-Brown, Celia. (1988). Resistance and Renewal Surviving the Indian Residential School. Vancouver, Canada: Tillacum Press.
  6. Jack, Rita and Marie Matthew and Robert Matthew. (1993). Shuswap Community Handbook. Kamloops, Canada: Secwepemc Cultural Education Society.
  7. Kamloops Indian Band. (July 2001). Lex'Yem. Kamloops, Canada: KIB Publishing.
  8. McDiarmid, Tami & Rita Manzo & Trish Musselle. (1999). Critical Challenges For Primary Students. Burnaby, Canada: Simon Fraser University.
  9. Manuel, Kathy (ed.). (2001). Secwepemc News. Kamloops, Canada: Secwepemc Cultural Education Society.
  10. Murphy, Peter & George P. Nicholas & Marianne Ignace (ed). Coyote U: Stories andTeachings of the Secwepemc Education Institute. Penticton, Canada: Theytus Publishing.
  11. Nicholas, George (ed). (2001). Coyote Times: The SCES/SFU University Program Newsletter. Kamloops, Canada: SCES/SFU Campus.
  12. Sawyer, Don. (1988). Donna Meets Coyote. Kamloops, Canada: Secwepemc Cultural Education Society.
  13. Sawyer, Don & Anne Waters. (1988). Donna Meets Coyote Teacher's Guide. Kamloops, Canada: Secwepemc Cultural Education Society.
  14. School District 73. (1989). We Are the Shuswap Teacher's Kit. Kamloops, Canada: Henry Grube Centre.
  15. Secwepemc Cultural Education Society. (1996). Mind, Body and Spirit. (Video) Kamloops: SCES
  16. Siska, Heather Smith. (1988). We Are The Shuswap. Kamloops, Canada: Secwepemc Cultural Education Society.
  17. Steele, Bob. (1998). Draw Me A Story. Winnipeg, Canada: Peguis Publishers.
  18. Sterling, Shirley. (1992). My Name Is Seepeetza. Vancouver, Canada:Douglas & McIntyre

Personal Communications

  1. Gottfriedson, Garry: approval for map and lesson plans on behalf of KIB, Sept-Oct 2001
  2. Ignace, Marianne: personal communication June 2001
  3. Jules,John : personal communication and approval for map and lesson plans on behalf of KIB, Sept-Oct 2001
  4. Jules, Mona: personal communication June 2001
  5. KIB Lands office: personal communication June, July, August 2001
  6. Manuel, Charlotte: personal communication July 2001
  7. Secwepemc Cultural Education Society: personal communication June, July 2001
  8. Spence, Renee: personal communication June 2001

Websites

  1. www.mwsolutions.com
  2. www.secwepemc.org
  3. www.yecminme.com

Workshop Materials

  1. Workshop Material from Judi Gelowitz- Primary Social Studies Unit: Judi Gelowitz,...(District 73).
  2. Workshop Material from Mary Campone (District 73).
  3. Workshop Material from Roland Case. Tools For Social Studies Applications.

Phone Numbers

  1. Secwepemc Cultural Education Society: 250-828-9779
  2. Secwepemc Cultural Education Society Museum: 828-9801
  3. Kamloops Indian Band Office: 828-9700
  4. Secwepemc News: 828-9783
  5. Henry Grube Educational Resource Centre (SD #73): 250-376-2266




Name_________________ Date__________________

Social Studies: Leadership

Tell of something interesting you learned about the Kamloops Indian Band. Give a good reason, also.












/3

The Chief of the Kamloops Indian Band is . . .


/1

A question I would like to ask the chief of the Kamloops Indian Band is . . .






/3

The Mayor of Kamloops is . . .


/1

Name at least 2 things that are the same between the 2 communities. Give good sentence answers.










/4

Name at least 2 things that are different between the 2 communities. Give good sentence answers.










/4

Describe an elder.








/2

This is a picture of something interesting I learned about communities today:







/3

Something else I would still like to know about leaders of communities is:
















/4




Student Work on the "Leadership" (Worksheet #1) and accompanying drawing shall be marked accordingly:
Question Rating Comments
1) The answer reflects an interest in the topic discussed and justifies it with reason. 3 2 1  
2) The answer is correct, which indicates interest and interaction on the topic. 1  
3) The answer reflects an interest in the topic discussed and justifies it with reason. 3 2 1  
4) The answer is correct, which indicates interest and interaction on the topic. 1  
5) The answer is indicative of 2 things which are alike amongst the 2 communities. They may be that which were not discussed in class and are something new indicating deeper thought process. 4 3 2 1  
6) The answer is indicative of 2 things which are different amongst the 2 communities. They may be that which were not discussed in class and are something new indicating deeper thought process. 4 3 2 1  
7) The answer reflects at least 2 things previously discussed, or something else indicating deeper thought. 2 1  
8) The drawing should be connected to the class discussion, but not limited to it. It should be thought provoking and possibly indicate the student has taken the ideas beyond those submitted in the class discussion and come up with his/her own new ideas. 2 1  
9) The answer should be connected to the class discussion, but not limited to it. It should be thought provoking and possibly indicate the student has taken the ideas beyond those submitted in the class discussion and come up with his/her own new ideas to ponder for future growth. 4 3 2 1  
Total: /25