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FNSS Curriculum Integration Project Click here to download this lesson.
Angela Smart (MS-Word format.)

Grade: 6
Lesson 2: Richard Hunt and Transformation Masks
Time: 90 minutes

Topic: An examination of the Kwakiutl culture through the creative works of Richard Hunt.

Rationale: It is important that students evaluate and experience the art of the Kwakiutl society as such experiences will allow for a greater understanding of this culture. Such an understanding will serve as an educational foundation for subsequent lessons and a reinforcement of previous lessons.

Materials and Resources

  • replica of a Richard Hunt transformation mask (may have to create own, see www.mendels.com for detailed instructions: copyrighted)
  • background information on Richard Hunt (see www.artsconnected.org, www.richardhunt.com, and www.blacktusk.ca)
  • samples of Richard Hunt’s work and several African masks for display (see above links)
  • plaster impregnated gauze (one roll per student), bowl of water, Vaseline, tempura paint, cardboard, paintbrushes, glue, scissors and construction paper (see www.mendels.com)

Vocabulary

Elements of design
an image’s line, shape, space, colour and texture
Principles of design
an image’s balance, pattern and unity
Ovoid
rounded rectangle
U Form
characteristic Northwest Coast feature, usually used to contour a bird, animal body or body parts
Split U Form
seen in ears, tails and many open spaces
S Form
derived from two halves of a “U” form joined in opposite directions
Abstract
not representing things pictorially as they are

Main Concepts
To explore how to create transformation masks and how these masks are used within the Kwakiutl culture.

Learning Outcomes

  • analyze how a society’s artistic expression reflects its culture
  • create images using a variety of materials
  • use the elements of line, shape, space, colour and texture and the principles of balance, pattern and unity in an original art work

Assessment and Evaluation
The students ability to demonstrate their understanding of the Prescribed Learning Outcomes for this lesson can evaluated through their masks. Due to the subjective nature of artwork, the student will be assessed on whether or not they included the elements and principles of design and used a variety of materials (see Appendix D in the IRP for an example). Classroom participation can also be recorded and incorporated into the students’ total mark

Planned Learning Activities

  1. Discussion regarding Richard Hunt: who is he? what does his work look like? provide background info; students to share the information that they obtained on the artist
  2. Visual gallery: display Hunt’s work throughout the classroom; students to browse and comment on his usage of the elements and principles of design; students to discuss with partner and then share with class
  3. Elicit students to make secondary comparisons; display several African masks and discuss
  4. Discuss/explore concept of “transformation”; relate this to what they have already learned in previous lesson on “transformations”
  5. Directly teach students how to create their own transformation masks using plaster, cardboard and coloured construction paper; see www.mendels.com (copyright) for detailed instructions
  6. Allow students to make masks and then share with class; what do they mean for them?

Extensions
Weaker students and/or students with disabilities should be able to participate in all activities included in this lesson. A modified version of the mask will be permitted depending on their individual capabilities. Students seeking enrichment can extend this activity and write a story about an inner transformation that changed the way that they looked at the world.

Other Integration Opportunities
This lesson can be used as part of Language Arts (descriptive writing) and CAPP (self-image)

Other Supplementary Material Available

  • Looking At Indian Art of the Northwest Coast. Hilary Stewart. University of Washington Press. Seattle. 1979. (print)
  • Faces of the Spirit: Masks for the Zaire Basin. Frank Herreman and Constantijn Petridis. Snoeck-Ducaju and Zoon. Ghent. 1993. (print)
  • Cut and Make North American Indian Masks in Full Colour. A.G. Smith and Josie Hazan. Dover Publishing, Inc. New York. 1989. (print)



  • What will the teacher do? What will the student do? Time
    Introduction:
    • motivate students interest by beginning the lesson wearing a replica of a Richard Hunt’s transformation mask;elicit comments on the impact of the mask
    • introduce lesson and provide an advance organizer on blackboard
    • state learning outcomes and rationale of lesson
    Introduction:
    • observe teacher wearing the transformation mask
    • discuss the impact of the mask; what they notice
    • listen quietly
    10 min
    Body:
    • discussion regarding Richard Hunt: who is he? what does his work look like? provide background info
    • students to share the information that they obtained on the artist
    • visual gallery: display Hunt’s work throughout the classroom; students to browse and comment on his usage of the elements and principles of design
    • students to discuss with partner and then share with class
    • elicit students to make secondary comparisons; display several African masks
    • discuss/explore concept of “transformation”; relate this to what they have already learned in previous lesson
    • directly teach students how to create their own transformation masks using plaster, cardboard and coloured construction paper
    Body:
    • listen to discussion on Richard Hunt
    • share the information that they obtained on the artist
    • browse through visual gallery and comment on the artists usage of the elements and principles of design
    • discuss with partner and share findings with the class
    • make secondary comparisons using African masks
    • discuss what they already know about “transformations” as per previous lessons
    • watch the teacher carefully for instructions on how to make the mask
    • independently make own transformation mask
    70 min
    Closing:
    • elicit students to share their masks with class; what do they mean?
    • ask: describe one thing that you learned during today’s lesson?
    • have volunteers restate learning outcomes and rationale
    Closing:
    • students to share their masks with the class and discuss what they mean
    • describe one thing that you learned during the lesson
    • volunteer to restate learning outcomes and rationale
    10 min